Monday, March 15, 2010

Mass Oyster Hats Have Arrived! Spring Parties! Conference Season! Fort Point Channel Restoration Initiative

Like a wave building to crash on a beach the spring season for the Massachusetts Oyster Project is arriving with breathtaking swiftness.

Fort Point Channel

On the oyster placement side, we recently met with the Friends of the Fort Point Channel’s abutting property owners to discuss raising oysters and beginining an oyster restoration initiative in the Channel. To learn more about the Channel click on Link to Friends of Fort Point Channel. This is an area of the harbor that has considerable run-off flowing into it. We are excited about working with this group and beginning this exciting initiative. Already we have several grant applications outstanding including one put together by star grant writer Mary Brevard that was submitted on Friday.

 
The Channel includes landmark buildings such as The Children’s Museum, Atlantic Wharf, and the Intercontinental Hotel. Here is a view of the Children's Museum. 


To learn more about this wonderful institution you can click on Link to Boston Children's Museum.


Hats are here! Show your support.

The new Massachusetts Oyster Project Hats have arrived. We will soon be setting up a link to purchase them on-line for $14 plus $2 shipping. In the meantime you can send a check to MOP at 67 Old Rutherford Avenue Charlestown, MA 02129. 







 



Spring parties are beginning. Save the following dates.


  • April 15 Tavern on the Water- Charlestown
  • May 2 B & G Oysters
Scientific Presentations and Conferences

MOP also will be presenting at two spring scientific conferences in April. At the New England Fish and Wildlife Conference in Newton we will give an overview of the oyster restoration program's progress to date. At the Amherst Water Resource Conference we will be discussing the relative cost-effectiveness of oysters vs. nitorgen extraction at sewage treatment plants  Oysters are 1.4% nitrogen by weight as they sequester nitrogen in their shells. The average person excretes 12 pounds of nitrogen per year and excessive amounts can lead to bacterial blooms, red tides and imbalances in coastal ecosystems.





No comments:

Post a Comment